Money Saving Links: 9/26/08

09.26.08 | Savings Links | 1 Comment | by junger

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This week, we participated in the Carnival of Personal Finance hosted by Sound Money Matters.

While there weren't too many stories directly related to online banking and using the Internet to save you money, there were a lot of great tips. Here are a couple of the highlights:

The 60 Percent Solution and Mint.com - Cash on the Barrelhead

Super, super cool, because everything goes into pie charts, which is the only way that money (or math of any kind, really) makes sense to my brain. Just click, and you can see one month of where your money is. Or three months, etc. Click on any pie slice for the gory details of what your money is doing. After we’ve got enough data in it, we’ll be able to see (in bar graph–I like those, too) how our spending stacks up against other people.

29 Steps I Took to Leave the Workforce at Age 29 - My Dollar Plan

At age 29 I left the corporate world behind and I’m embarking on a new chapter in my life: spending more time with my kids (ages 1 and 2), following my passion (teaching others about personal finance), and an overall life of freedom not tied to a JOB! Here’s how I did it (and how you can too!)

Are You a Millionaire in the Making? - The Dough Roller

Becoming a millionaire is about the simple, daily choices we all make. So with that, let’s see whether you are a millionaire in the making.

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